The Four Types of Spousal Support

When a couple decides to divorce, it is usually an extended process. Divorce becomes final when a court ends the marriage legally and each party is free to go on with their life. However, having a divorce ends your marriage but does not mean that you cannot support your partner since you are a high-income earner. Spousal support is an order from the court that a certain amount of financial assistance is paid by one spouse to the other.

Rehabilitative support

Rehabilitative support ensures that an unemployed spouse is provided with the time and financial help to support his or herself. This type of alimony supports partners who are not equipped with job skills or are not educated. Rehabilitative spousal support ensures that they have adequate funds to support themselves since they are not qualified to enter the workforce. The time allotted to rehabilitative spousal support differs because it depends on the evidence of each case. However, this type of alimony is generally non-permanent but examined at the end of the duration.

Temporary spousal support

A divorce might take a long time to end because the process is usually a drawn-out procedure. This will require that one of the couples move out of the house. At this period, both spouses will keep on with paying the mortgage or rent, taxes, and shared bills and charges. To focus on these financial worries, a judge can give the order that the low-income earning partner be given temporary spousal support. This type of alimony will help him or her to sustain the partner’s status while financing the basic needs throughout the court hearing. Temporary spousal support sees to it that both spouses are financially stable during the divorce process.

Lump-sum spousal support

This type of alimony is when a spouse receives financial assistance that covers the long-drawn demand of monthly payments after the divorce. Lump-sum support is a prearranged amount, which cannot be changed, in the nearest future. It is a payment ahead of time so that the spouse receiving it does not expect a paycheck every month. The court is responsible for deciding the total amount of the monthly future payments after the divorce processes and demand for a lump-sum payment that is equivalent to the calculated amount.

Permanent spousal support

Permanent alimony often goes on until the receiving spouse passes on or marries another person. This type of spousal support does not continue if the paying spouse dies. Certain states end the permanent spousal support if the spouse receiving the alimony is moves in with a new partner. However, every state has set rules for cohabitation and alimony. Typically, courts set aside permanent alimony for stable marriages where there is a huge difference in income.

However, if you are planning your divorce and have decided to demand for alimony, the Mike Morse law firm has a qualified team of family law attorneys who will be there to offer legal assistance throughout your divorce process.

Conclusion

Spousal support often depends on the specific information and circumstances surrounding your divorce case. To grant spousal support, most courts will assess the duration of the marriage, the capacity of each spouse to earn income, the health conditions of both spouses. In some states, courts also consider the attitudes of each partner throughout their marriage. Generally, spousal support is granted to the spouse who has been married for a long time or abandoned his job to handle marriage concerns or care for their children.

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